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ORIGINAL HYPOTHESIS
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 90-94

Calcium hydroxide-induced resorption of deciduous teeth: A possible explanation


1 Department of Pedodontics, Drs Sudha and Nageswara Rao Siddhartha Institute of Dental Sciences, Chinoutapally, Gannavaram, Andhra Pradesh, India
2 Department of Oral Pathology, Drs Sudha and Nageswara Rao Siddhartha Institute of Dental Sciences, Chinoutapally, Gannavaram, Andhra Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
R V Subramanyam
Department of Oral Pathology, Drs Sudha and Nageswara Rao Siddhartha Institute of Dental Sciences, Chinoutapally, Gannavaram-521 286, Andhra Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2155-8213.103910

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Introduction: Calcium hydroxide (CaH) is customarily used for permanent teeth but not for deciduous dentition because it is known to cause internal resorption in the latter. Though this has been attributed to chronic inflammation and odontoclasts, the exact mechanism has not been elucidated. The Hypothesis: The authors propose an explanation that CaH-induced odontoclastogenesis could be multifactorial. Odontoclasts may result from fusion of cells of monocyte/macrophage series either due to inflammatory mediators or through stimulation by stromal odontoblasts /fibroblasts. Pre-existing progenitor cells of primary tooth pulp because of their inherent propensity may transform into odontoclasts. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: The hypothesis discusses the role of various inflammatory cytokines that may be responsible for CaH-induced transformation of pre-odontoclasts to odontoclasts. Alternatively, pre-existing progenitor cells with proclivity to change into odontoclasts may cause internal resorption. The loss of protective layer of predentin over mineralized dentin may also make the primary tooth more susceptible to resorption.


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