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ORIGINAL RESEARCH
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 86-90

Comparison of Hard and Soft Tissues Around Dental Implants in Smokers and Non-smokers


1 Dental Implants Research Center, Department of Dental Prosthodontics, Dental Research Institute, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2 Department of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran, Iran
3 Dental Research Center, School of Dentistry, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Seyedmilad Salmani
Dental Implants Research Center, Department of Dental Prosthodontics, Dental Research Institute, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/denthyp.denthyp_16_20

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Introduction: Previous studies have shown that smoking has a significant impact on the success of dental implants. Therefore, the present study was aimed to compare the health of soft and hard tissues surrounding dental implants in smokers and non-smokers in Isfahan. Materials and Methods: The population of this cross-sectional study included 30 smokers and 30 non-smoker patients who received dental implant treatment. The health of soft tissue around the dental implant (by probing the depth index), soft tissue health (with the gingivitis index), bleeding on probe (BOP), plaque index and the health of hard tissue (bone loss) of two groups of smokers and non-smokers were studied and compared. The data were collected and entered into SPSS version 24 and were analyzed using chi-square, Mann Whitney test, and t-test. The analyses were performed at a significant level of P < 0.05. Results: The mean value of the gingival health index in the smokers and non-smokers was 2.17 ± 0.63 and 1.77 ± 0.87, respectively (P < 0.001), the mean of PD index in the smokers and non-smokers was 2.83 ± 0.73 and 7.2 ± 0.7 mm, respectively (P = 0.31). Of the 72 dental implants for the smokers and 71 for the non-smoker 40.3% and 16.9% had severe plaque around their dental implants and the plaque severity was significantly different in the two groups (P = 0.008). The bone loss rates in the smokers and non-smoker groups were 1.57 ± 0.44 and 1.39 ± 0.44 mm, respectively, which were significantly different (P = 0.015). Conclusion: The health of soft and hard tissues around the dental implant is lower in smokers than non-smokers. Considering patients’ expectations for the cost of treatment for dental implants, patients who need dental implant therapy should receive proper care, training, and encouragement to quit smoking before their dental implant treatment.


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